The kingdom of Benin in the sixteenth century
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The kingdom of Benin in the sixteenth century by Elizabeth M. McClelland

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Published by Oxford University Press in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Benin (Kingdom)

Subjects:

  • Bini (African people) -- History -- 16th century -- Juvenile literature.,
  • Benin (Kingdom) -- Social life and customs -- Juvenile literature.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement[by] Elizabeth M. McClelland.
SeriesCities and societies
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDT515.9.B37 M3
The Physical Object
Pagination52 p;
Number of Pages52
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5330495M
ISBN 100199130256
LC Control Number72183559
OCLC/WorldCa409909

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British Museum Press, - Art - pages 0 Reviews When the Portuguese made the first European contact with the west African kingdom of Benin in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth. The author, Nigel Barley, is a famous anthropologist and writer, best known for his books about his experiences in the field. When the Portuguese made the first European contact with the west African kingdom of Benin in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the .   Published to accompany the major international touring exhibition which comes to Chicago in the summer of , this monumental volume features more than stunning reproductions alongside important new scholarship on the prized sculptures and carvings of the Benin Kingdom of sixteenth- through nineteenth-century West Africa (pre-colonial Nigeria). It brings together for the . The book stands for providing deep knowledge about Benin’s government, arts, everyday life, and religion. It also has some facts related to the other African nations The Benin Plaques: A 16th Century Imperial Monument.

A Brief History The kingdom of Benin was established in 40BC and was at its height and glory between the 14th and the 16th centuries. We can get an idea of the kingdom’s grandeur and accomplishments from the bronze plaques commissioned by the kings (Obas) to commemorate and record achievements during their reign. Fiction and non-fiction books set completely or at least partially in Benin. Score A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book. He established a hereditary succession to the throne and vastly expanded the territory of the Benin kingdom, which by the midth century extended from the Niger River delta in the east to what is now Lagos in the west. (Lagos was in fact founded by a Benin army and continued to pay tribute to the oba of Benin until the end of the 19th century. The Benin Bronzes are a group of more than a thousand metal plaques and sculptures that decorated the royal palace of the Kingdom of Benin in what is now modern-day Nigeria. Collectively, the objects form the best known examples of Benin art, created from the thirteenth century onwards, by the Edo people, which also included other sculptures in brass or bronze, including some famous portrait.

The 16th century bronze plaques from the kingdom of Benin are among the most recognized masterpieces of African art, and yet many details of their commission and installation in the palace in Benin City, Nigeria, are little understood. The Benin Plaques, A 16th Century Imperial Monument is a detailed analysis of a corpus of nearly bronze plaques that were installed in the court of the. They were created from at least the 16th century onwards in the West African Kingdom of Benin, by specialist guilds working for the royal court of the Oba (king) in Benin City. The Kingdom also supported guilds working in other materials such as ivory, leather, coral and wood, and the term 'Benin Bronzes' is sometimes used to refer to historic.   The Benin Plaques, A 16th Century Imperial Monument is a detailed analysis of a corpus of nearly bronze plaques that were installed in the court of the Benin kingdom at the moment of its greatest political power and geographic reach. By examining European accounts, Benin oral histories, and the physical evidence of the extant plaques.   Mask from Benin, 16th century; ivory, iron and copper wire. The book is a vital call to action: part historical investigation, part manifesto, demanding the reader do away with the existing.