Fire and woodland caribou in southeastern Manitoba
Read Online
Share

Fire and woodland caribou in southeastern Manitoba by James A. Schaefer

  • 14 Want to read
  • ·
  • 83 Currently reading

Published by Wildlife Society in [Bethesda, Md.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Caribou -- Manitoba -- Effect of habitat modification on.,
  • Forest fires -- Canada -- Environmental aspects.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesJournal of wildlife management. Vol. 55, no. 2 (Supplement)
Statementby James A. Schaefer and William O. Pruitt, Jr.
SeriesWildlife monographs -- no. 116
ContributionsPruitt, William O. 1922-, Wildlife Society.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL737.U55 S46 1991
The Physical Object
Pagination39 p. :
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18402863M

Download Fire and woodland caribou in southeastern Manitoba

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

  The winter range of the population, years after fire, was mutually exclusive with its prefire range. Taiga in southeastern Manitoba is not suitable for woodland caribou in its recently-burned and intermediate stages (up to 50 yrs following fire). Yet fire may be necessary to maintain optimal, long-term lichen resources. Taiga in southeastern Manitoba is not suitable for woodland caribou in its recently-burned and intermediate stages (up to 50 yrs following fire). Yet fire may be necessary to maintain optimal, long-term lichen resources. The available maps for Woodland Caribou Provincial Park present a trade-off: The small scale 1 x 50, Canadian topographic maps offer lots of detail except for showing very few of the portages. The official, larger scale park map shows less of the area’s detail–and no topographical information–but does mark the park’s portages. MANITOBA’S BOREAL WOODLAND CARIBOU RECOVER STRATEG iii Manitoba’s boreal Woodland Caribou recovery strategy is a living document that outlines management initiatives and direction for conservation of boreal caribou across Manitoba for the next 10 years. it was developed to ensure caribou are retained as part of our valued boreal ecosystem.

DRAFT - Action Plans for Boreal Woodland Caribou Ranges in Manitoba 1 The year sited on Manitoba’s Conservation and Recovery Strategy for boreal woodland caribou iii was a misprint. The year should have read Action Plan Development. The boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), also known as woodland caribou, boreal forest caribou and forest-dwelling caribou, is a North American subspecies of the reindeer (or the caribou in North America) with the vast majority of animals in the Porcupine caribou and barren-ground caribou, boreal woodland caribou are primarily, but not always, Family: Cervidae. Woodland Caribou Provincial Park, Red Lake, ON. K likes. This Woodland Caribou P.P. page will describe through images provided by park staff what you could expect when you ers: 2K. Woodland Caribou often weigh in at an average of pounds or more and yield antlers in the inch range. For more information, please see the section on Woodland Caribou within the Department of Environment and Conservation website. The Woodland Caribou-hunting season runs from mid September to the last of December.

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park is a partner in the Pimachiowin Aki World Heritage Project. Five First Nations and the Ontario and Manitoba governments are seeking World Heritage Site status for a linked network of protected areas. For more information visit Caribou Fire & Ambulance Department, Caribou, ME. K likes. This department is responsible for delivery of Fire Control & Advanced Life Support Emergency Medical Services. Extrication of /5(64). The migratory woodland caribou refers to two herds of Rangifer tarandus (known as caribou in North America) that are included in the migratory woodland ecotype of the subspecies Rangifer tarandus caribou or woodland caribou that live in Nunavik, Québec, and Labrador: the Leaf River caribou herd (LRCH) and the George River caribou herd (GRCH) south of Ungava : Cervidae. Managing fire for woodland caribou in Jasper and Banff National Parks Landon Shepherd 1, Fiona Schmiegelow 2, & Ellen Macdonald 2 1 Parks Canada, Jasper National Park, Jasper AB, T0E 1E0.